Nishkam family and the City of Birmingham remember elder statesman who has passed away

Mr Sewa Singh Mandla OBE - 4th Jan 1927 – 6th Oct 2017

Mr Sewa Singh Mandla OBE – 4th Jan 1927 – 6th Oct 2017

The community has suffered a major loss as one of the pillars of the Sikh community in the UK, Mr Sewa Singh Mandla OBE, a proud member of the Birmingham Faith Leaders Group, Trustee and Non–executive member of the Nishkam Civic Association and former Chair of many Trusts and Boards, aged 90 passed away on the 6th October 2017.

Sewa Singh Mandla was born on the 4th January 1927 in Nairobi Kenya. As an amritdhari, disciplined Sikh faith practitioner and legal professional, he was the corner stone of the Nishkam Civic Association, as one of its founder members. Having qualified and practiced as a lawyer in Kenya, he was considered a heavyweight in the legal profession. An extrovert who could relate to people of all walks of life irrespective of status, seniority, age, gender, faith tradition, Mr Mandla considered all equally and lovingly with his humble compassionate approach. He was a thorough professional, impeccably dressed and presented, an individual who was both strategic in thought but always had an eye on the detail.

In 1974, he migrated to the U.K and qualified as a Solicitor of the Supreme Court of United Kingdom. He set up his own legal practice in Handsworth Birmingham, becoming the first non-white Solicitor to have practised in the Birmingham Magistrates Court. He provided much needed services to the Black, Minority and Ethnic communities with great success. He worked tirelessly for all sections of Handsworth and Birmingham communities, building bonds, and creating social cohesion. This period also led him to become an active volunteer for the growing Sikh, Hindu, Muslim and Christian places of worship and charitable institutions, providing legal advice and aid on a pro-bono basis.

As a respected, high profile lawyer, a community and inter-faith leader in Birmingham he was appointed Officer of British Empire (OBE) in recognition of his 50 years’ legal, human rights and selfless community voluntary service. A long serving volunteer at the Guru Nanak Nishkam Sewak Jatha (GNNSJ) and a trustee at the Nishkam Civic Association, Mr Mandla has made significant contribution to community and inter-faith development work in the city, nationally and

internationally under the guidance and leadership of Bhai Sahib, Bhai Mohinder Singh OBE KSG. He personally sphere-headed the landmark trip of the Birmingham Faith Leaders Group to Amritsar India as well as arranged an auspicious visit and meeting of Sikhs with the Pope at the Vatican.

In 1983 Mr Mandla made legal history for the Sikh community and the legal profession whereby the decision of the Law Lords made a ground breaking case law for the Sikhs to wear turbans (Mandla vs Lee 1983). The headmaster of a private school in Birmingham, Mr. Lee refused to grant Mr Mandla’s son admission in his school unless he removed his turban, cut his traditional long hair and wore a school cap. Mr Mandla commenced legal proceedings against the headmaster for Racial Discrimination under the Race Relations Act 1976 and also organised a protest march in Hyde Park, London in which 40,000 people of diverse communities took part. A petition, signed by more than 70,000 people against the decision of the lower courts and highlighting the importance of a Turban to a Sikh, was presented to the Prime Minster at 10 Downing Street. The House of Lords decided in favour of Mr Mandla.

Mr Mandla devoted his entire life to work as a volunteer to serve the needs of voluntary and community organisations, bringing about change to improve the quality of life of the disadvantaged members of the Community. His most outstanding contributions was to the work of many organisations including, Guru Nanak Nishkam Sewak Jatha (GNNSJ) where he spent an average of eight hours daily, serving the Gurdrwara, its congregation and the Trust. As a founding trustee of the Nishkam Civic Association (NCA) he was most passionate about its work and vision. He has worked tirelessly for many other boards and bodies including Chairmanship of Council Of Sikh Gurdwaras Birmingham; Birmingham Council of Faith’s, and the Roger Hooker Memorial Trust. He was also Vice Chair and Trustee for Religions for Peace UK Chapter, and Founder Member Birmingham Faith Leaders Group.

Mr Mandla was constantly in the media as a spokesperson for the Sikh community; multiculturalism in UK; the legal profession; the success of immigrant communities; and health and wellbeing issues.

Prof. Upkar Singh Pardesi, Vice Chair of Nishkam Civic Association (NCA, also known as the Nishkam Centre) said, “The Sikh and wider community in Birmingham and the region has lost one of the longest serving lawyers, an active volunteer, and role model for spirituality. Mr Mandla shone and became a legend for his ability to successfully fuse his professional work in law with spirituality to make a difference to the Sikh and wider communities in the UK. Mr Mandla’s perseverance to take the issue of turbans worn by Sikh pupils in schools, is a testament of his dedication to fight for a just cause. He had an extraordinary passion and flair for serving the community in the pursuit of making a difference. His perseverance to follow through projects and tasks was one of his outstanding qualities.”

Mr Mandla is survived by his son, Gurinder and daughter Tina and six grandchildren and our thought and prayers are with them all during this time. His legacy and contribution will remain for years to come and he will be missed by so many.

Funeral service details for Bhai Sewa Singh Mandla Ji

For more information:

Please contact Prof Upkar Singh Pardesi, Vice Chairman, Nishkam Civic Association on 07974150320

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